A Handful of Quiet Book for Mindfulness Lessons

I have a mindful mornings group that meets before school to help us all start the day in the right mindset. I try to incorporate different types of exercises so that all students can find something that works for them. Mantra meditation isn’t something we do all too frequently but when we do, A Handful of Quiet is a great book to pull from! It’s written by the expert himself, Thich Nhat Hanh. If you have a mindfulness group or are just looking for lesson openers or closers, you and your students will enjoy A Handful of Quiet for your mindfulness counseling activities!

a handful of quiet mindfulness activities: use these for your mindful mornings program or for classroom guidance lessons and small group counseling sessions

A Handful of Quiet Mindfulness Activities


Reactions & Responses:

After reading the story, talk about students’ reactions and responses to what they’ve heard!

  • What are your reactions to this practice?
  • What do you think it will be like to try this?

Activities:

Give students 4 smooth stones or pebbles (like river rock) to hold during the activity. If these are not available, use 4 small balls of play dough or something similar. Students will sit comfortably in their space on the floor, on cushions, or in chairs. Play quiet music, meditation soundtrack, river sounds, etc. Students will place the 4 stones on the floor in front of them as they listen to the music/sounds. Lead students through the flower/fresh, mountain/solid, still water/reflect, and space/free mantras from the book.

For an introductory lesson, you may choose to just do one mantra. If your students have practiced mindfulness before, you may be able to complete all 4. After each statement, give students around 60 seconds to simply hold the pebble and reflect on the words. Then, pick up a new pebble and do the next mantra.

If you have extended time, you may choose to let students paint their pebbles or write the words on the pebbles so that they can keep them to use at home.

Debrief:

  • Describe how you felt during this activity.
  • What does it mean to be a flower? What does it mean to be fresh?
  • What does it mean to you to be a mountain? What does it mean to be solid?
  • What does it mean to be still water? What does it mean to reflect things as they are?
  • What does it mean to be space? What does it mean to be free?

More Activities:

Want more mindfulness activities for your students? Check out these easy to use activities:

More Great Books About Mindfulness:

a handful of quiet mindfulness activities: use these for your mindful mornings program or for classroom guidance lessons and small group counseling sessions on mindfulness and mindful moments.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
0 Shares
Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap